Cialis Effectively Treats ED

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complaint in men, particularly as they age. Millions of men of all ages suffer from the condition on a regular basis. Specific medical conditions and stress can cause ED. Fortunately, there are treatments that help men confidently engage in sexual activity again. One of the most effective is Cialis. There are specific steps you can take to improve the drug's usefulness.

Seek Professional Help

It is a good idea to get a doctor to review your medical record before deciding to take any ED drug. Men who have heart problems or take nitrates are typically warned to avoid this medication. Consult your doctor as soon as you begin experiencing ED symptoms. The sooner you can begin treating ED, the better chance you have of fully recovering from the condition.

Other ED Medications

You may have also considered taking Levitra or Viagra. These are the other two leading drugs marketed for ED treatment. Generally speaking, all ED drugs work the same way. They allow blood flow to enter the penis so that men can achieve and maintain an erection after being sexually stimulated. A hard erection is the only way to obtain successful sexual intercourse.

Why Cialis is More Effective

This particular ED treatment stands out because it has a 36-hour effective period. For this reason, you do not need to take the medication daily. And you can still achieve satisfying erections during that time period. Because of its extended use period, men can be more spontaneous rather than having to plan their intimate encounters.

ED Treatment and Prevention

If you experience ED symptoms, it is important that you learn what is causing your ED. Your doctor can help identify medical problems like high or low blood pressure, heart conditions, or diabetes. But your lifestyle may also be contributing to your ED. Consuming too much alcohol or using illicit drugs can lead to your impotence. So can stress and depression. While ED drugs can help on a short-term basis, you really need to figure out what is causing your condition and address those issues as well.
Cialis can help with your ED while you work to regain a healthy lifestyle. Watch your weight, eat right, and exercise regularly to reduce stress and improve your overall health. Taking these steps will improve the effectiveness of Cialis to treat erectile dysfunction so you can have satisfying sexual encounters.

Levitra and the Emotional Effects of Erectile Dysfunction

Many people think about the effect of erectile dysfunction on a relationship or marriage and don't stop to consider the emotional effects to the man suffering from this condition. While the treatment for erectile dysfunction might be easy, this doesn't erase the psychological distress caused by erectile dysfunction. Even though most men will experience erectile dysfunction at some point in life, it is still an embarrassing and sensitive topic. If it doesn't go away after one occurrence, anxiety, guilt, depression, frustration, and embarrassment can all be felt.

Although an erection is a physical process, there are many emotional factors that lead to its occurrence. If you do not address these factors, the problem may continue to return. Your best bet is to treat the entire problem. Levitra does a great job of addressing the physical problem of erectile dysfunction, so that you can focus on the emotional.

Many times erectile dysfunction goes untreated because the man is too embarrassed to go to the doctor. However, treatment is important because erectile dysfunction may be a symptom of a bigger problem. Although it is natural to feel embarrassed, ten percent of men older than 40, and forty percent of men older than 50 have experienced erectile dysfunction - so you are certainly not alone. The older one becomes, the more likely you are to experience erectile dysfunction, so even if you think you are "safe" odds are it will happen to you as well. Levitra is taken in pill form, so you could potentially take it any time anywhere, without other people knowing.

Another common emotion felt with erectile dysfunction is depression. This can be a complicated relationship - erectile dysfunction causes depression in some cases, and in others, erectile dysfunction is caused by the depression. Nonetheless, a real connection exists, and this has been backed by research on hormones. Many men do not understand how easy erectile dysfunction is treated and, mixed with the failure to seek treatment, are faced with more emotional turmoil than is necessary. Levitra is highly effective at treating erectile dysfunction, and if you are depressed because of your condition, this treatment can be a tool to overcome the depression.

Emotional discomfort can be immobilizing. However, with the medical advances available today, including Levitra, you do not need to suffer. While everyone can admit that erectile dysfunction is upsetting, it is easily treated and doesn't have to be a big deal. Seek treatment today and improve the quality of your life!

Government Responsibility for the Health of Its Citizens

In a country such as Indonesia with a population of approximately 250 million people with the level of the developing economy, making health care quality is not something that cheap stuff, because so many of the costs required to maintain the health of a citizen. For premises that the government issued a policy that every citizen is guaranteed health by removing the health budget 20% the cost of annual expenditure.

Let us suppose that we calculate the Indonesian State costs of 800 tryliun 1 year multiplied by 20% for health care costs is about a 160 tryliun only for health care costs, should a cost of registration is no longer supposed to be found in infants who are malnourished or other vitamin deficiencies, but not optimal because the cost is used and the amount of corruption in Indonesia has caused many infant found extreme malnutrition and other diseases such as polio and cataract, where government responsibility that has been chosen by its citizens in a democracy.

People's Health: Amanah Constitution

Health is a fundamental right which is only fitting to be the obligation of governments, both national and local. In the amendment of article 45 Constitution 28H Paragraph (1) stated, "Every person has the right to live prosperous mentally and physically, residing and get a good living environment and healthy and are entitled to health care." Furthermore, in Article 34 paragraph (3) 4th amendment declared "the state is responsible for the provision of health care facilities and public service facilities they deserve".

In addition, the government of Indonesia is one of the parties (state parties) stating its commitment to the international community to bind itself in the international covenants which regulate issues of economic, social, and cultural (ESC) or the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights ( ICESCR). Covenant has been ratified through Law no. 11/2005 on 28 October 2005. In Article 12 of the covenant was expressly stipulated that "States Parties to the present Covenant recognize the right of everyone to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health."

To realize the ideal conditions in the field of health care, the agenda is an urgent thing to do is:

1. In the short term we must continue to advocate (defense) rights in the health field. Problems and root causes of health services should be the themes of talks / discussions with residents in these communities. These discussions should formulate an agenda that contains the tabulation problem, the map problem, map the parties that have contributed to the health care problem-solvers. The parties involved, such as village heads, heads Health Center, Public Health Service or a member of Parliament could be invited attend the discussions. In addition to providing information as a resource, their presence should also be used to convey the pressure / demands of the problems that have been inventoried.

2. In the long run citizens must actively exert regulation health sector, which still marginalize the interests of society at large, especially the poor. For example, regulations on health budgets, service standards, the amount of levy health centers and hospitals, regulation of health services for poor households, such as GAKIN, ASKESKIN and SKTM to be easily obtained by the poor.

State - in this case the government, it must be constantly guarded and reminded residents to take care of his responsibility. By seeding the seeds of critical awareness at community level, collaborative efforts with other stakeholders - including governments, the presence of accessible health services and quality is a necessity.

Disaster Recovery Solutions With Call Center Service

No one is ever truly prepared for an emergency. We can try and envision the worst case scenario and plan a course of action to counteract the emergency. However, reacting to an emergency always carries an element of unpredictability. It is in the event of an emergency that individuals and companies are truly tested as to their commitment and resourcefulness. Emergencies, whether in the form of disasters or business mishaps, can threaten any company.

Therefore, there is an entire sub-industry in call center service that is created specifically to respond to callers in crisis. What types of emergencies might merit disaster recovery services? Fires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes and power outages are just some examples. Not only can these events have a devastating effect on your operation, but in times of crisis there is usually an overflow of phone traffic.

This is why today's answering service business offers many conveniences exclusively for emergency events. Some of these call center outsourcing companies offer backup power and other recovery initiatives to ensure for uninterrupted service on behalf of clients. They may also offer incentives like natural gas/propane electric generators for power outages, redundant and satellite phone lines and emergency facilities on standby.

The advantages of emergency call center outsourcing are indeed great. If your office were closed due to inclement weather or some other unforeseen event, you would no longer be able to answer in-coming calls. This would be bad enough if you were just a regular commercial business, but what if you were in some sort of health-related or emergency response business? Then the inability to take emergency calls could endanger the lives of your callers!

This emphasizes the importance of outsourcing calls to disaster recovery services. A remote receptionist service would provide excellent customer service anyway, but in the time of a disaster or unexpected major event, this is when good customer service is most crucial. Outsourcing calls during an emergency will lower your risk and perhaps even help safeguard the lives of your callers.

Remember that most telephone answering services also offer message delivery options, which deliver new messages to you by text, cell phone, email or fax. You can even choose to pre-screen your calls. Now is the best time to invest in good customer service courtesy of an answering service business. Just because an emergency situation is happening is no excuse to skimp on good customer service! For more information on finding a call answering service to work with, visit

Health Center Staff In Lead Role Preparing Their Campuses for Pandemic Flu

It sounds like the plot of the next blockbuster movie. A third of the world's population is struck down by a deadly virus that spreads across the globe so rapidly that there is no time to develop a vaccine. Up to half of those infected - even young, healthy adults - die. But as health professionals know, this scenario is not just a flight of fancy. It could be the very real effects of the next pandemic flu outbreak, particularly if H5N1 (also known as highly pathogenic avian flu) is the virus in question, and it is this knowledge that is pushing not just federal and state government but organizations and businesses throughout the world to develop a strategy to tackle it.

Within colleges and universities, the burden of pandemic flu planning is likely to fall upon many student health directors, even at institutions with environmental health and safety departments. John Covely, a consultant on pandemic flu planning and the co-author of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's pandemic plan, explains why this is so.

"Traditionally, emergency planning originates from public safety, or environment health and safety, but a communicable disease poses the biggest threat to students in group quarters. Thus, student health directors are often leading the emergency planning effort for the whole university, because the entire plan - not just the student health component - could be the difference in life or death for their students."

The importance of having a campus-wide plan that is ready - not just in the preliminary stages - when the pandemic strikes is all the more clear when you consider that, unlike seasonal flu, H5N1 has an increased risk for the typical student demographic of young, healthy adults. The startlingly high mortality rate of up to 60 percent is partly due to a protein, also found in the strain of virus responsible for the 1918 pandemic flu outbreak, which causes a response in a healthy immune system known as a "cytokine storm", often leading to respiratory failure and death.

Planning for such a massive and yet unpredictable event may seem a formidable task, but Dr. Anita Barkin, chair of the American College Health Association's pandemic planning committee, counsels that those universities and colleges that have yet to formulate a pandemic plan shouldn't feel overwhelmed by the work that lies before them. "Pandemic planning is about good emergency preparedness. The things we do to prepare for any emergency are the things we would do to prepare for pandemic flu," she explains.

Although the tragic Virginia Tech shootings this spring were a different kind of emergency, the issues are similar to the issues faced in the event of a pandemic flu outbreak. Coordinating resources, communicating with everyone on campus and deciding at what stage classes should be called off are questions that have to be answered in most emergency situations. Take your pandemic planning one step at a time, advises Barkin.

"The first step is to find out whether there is an existing emergency plan on campus," she says. "If there is, who is in charge of it? Health providers on campus should then take charge and begin to formulate the plan."

There are many unknown factors, but build the framework of the plan first with the elements you can be sure of. Form a committee with all key areas represented, including executive leadership. ACHA's Guidelines for Pandemic Planning provides a list as an example that may help you collate this. Identify the functions that will be critical in the case of a pandemic and the personnel on campus responsible for each of these, making sure there are enough people representing each function that should some become sick, the plan is not compromised. Identify decision makers, a chain of command, and what channels of communication are to be used. Finally, decide on the role of student health services. Many campuses will have the student health director as the key decision maker in the event of a pandemic, but for some it will be more appropriate for the student health director to have an advisory role instead. In any case, college health professionals will be crucial to the success of every plan.

The biggest question that is central to every campus-wide pandemic plan: when is the right time to send students home? Covely warns that universities cannot necessarily wait for cues from state public health departments before they make their decisions. "The university has to have its own in-depth criteria in advance of a pandemic, and the student health director should be very involved in developing those criteria."

Barkin suggests looking back to the 1918 influenza epidemic for context.

"In 1918, the virus spread across the country in three to four weeks. If you think about the fact that the virus traveled from coast to coast in that short a time when the primary means of long-distance transport was the train, and then you think about how much more quickly we can travel today by plane, that timeline is going to be compressed significantly."

In other words, don't wait too long to send your students home. Nor should your trigger for this decision rely on the geographical proximity of the virus to your campus alone. Covely explains:

"Geographical proximity is not definitive enough in this age when in a single day, there are 50,000 passenger flights throughout the world," he says. "Because New York City and Hong Kong have major international airports, epidemiologically, New York City is actually closer to Hong Kong than it is to Buffalo, so waiting to suspend classes until a confirmed case gets to your region, or within 500 miles, may be too late."

The factors that will determine how early you make the call to send students home will center on the composition of your student population. If your students are mostly from in-state, they will probably be traveling home by car and so you can wait slightly longer before canceling classes and closing the campus down. If many students live a long way away and are going to need to use mass transportation, you may have to act more quickly or risk being swamped with very ill students at a time when the local hospitals will not have the resources to help.

There are three main elements that will shape the logistics and the scale of your plan, and help you figure out the best trigger to send students home. Remember that, as Barkin comments, "The longer you wait, the higher the rate of infection, the less chance of being able to get students home and the less likely you can manage the burden of disease."

These factors are as follows:

Student demographics, particularly the number of students who live on campus and the number of non-local students who are likely to be dependent on care.

The size of your staff (taking into account that up to 50 percent may be sick at one time).
Your ability to stockpile enough basic supplies, including medications, as well as personal protective equipment such as respirators.

This is where things start to get more complicated, however. Most student health services can't afford to stockpile many medical supplies. "ACHA is running a survey on pandemic planning," reveals Barkin. "Of the schools that have responded, most have not stockpiled, or if they have, it's not a lot." This could clearly prove disastrous, and for many colleges is a manifestation of what Covely cites as one of the biggest challenges of pandemic planning for some universities: "getting buy-in from the executive leadership." Pandemic planning is by no means a cost-free exercise.

One tip if you are facing resistance from campus decision-makers over spending money on pandemic planning is to emphasize the fact that once you've formulated a response to a possible pandemic, you will have a robust emergency response strategy that can be adapted to fit virtually any emergency, whether it's evacuation in the event of wildfires, such as Pepperdine University faced recently, a terrorist threat, or an "active shooter". Investment in, say, developing a Web site with emergency information and updates can be a public relations bonus and a reliable resource. Villanova University's plan includes broadcasting SMS text messages and e-mails and using an emergency Web page for mass communication.

When you do know the scope of your resources, both human and financial, you can continue to flesh out your plan. Excellent resources can be found on ACHA's Web site: and A tip from the experts: be wary of developing your plan in a vacuum. "I know of a school that didn't know their gymnasium was being considered as a point of vaccination until they happened to find out in the course of an outreach program," Barkin relates. "The local health department hadn't informed them." This is very obviously a benefit of starting a dialogue with your local health services: you find out what they have planned and you can also coordinate your plans to add value and decrease the number of unknown factors.

Dr. Mary McGonigle, director of the student health center at Villanova University, says that their dialogue with their local health department led to Villanova being assessed and labeled a "push" site, a location that is self-sufficient in this type of emergency. She explains:

"In the event of a pandemic, we'd go and pick up supplies from the county and then administer medicine to our Villanova community. That includes students, faculty and their families."

Help from the county is a financial boon but being self-sufficient and staying local also lowers the risk of spreading the virus so rapidly. The dialogue helps your local health services too. If your local hospitals are likely to have a shortage of beds, they may want to use college dorms for surge capacity at the peak of a pandemic. In return, they may be able to offer you some resources, although research suggests that most hospitals have not had the budget to be able to stockpile effectively either.

Once you have your plan together, it's important not just to file it away and forget about it. "Planning for a pandemic is very much a work in progress, but it is often hard to keep up the interest in reviewing and updating plans, especially when H5N1 activity drops out of the news," explains Covely. Tabletop exercises are one way to test the effectiveness of a plan and a good way to maintain interest. Covely specializes in facilitating these tabletops and finds that they can significantly increase staff's buy-in as well as providing useful discussion points.

"Used before the planning begins, tabletops provide a way of educating employees and getting them interested in developing continuity of operations plans," he says. "They are excellent for post planning too, in order to test the plans. I am always amazed at the creative analysis and insight that comes from a tabletop."

The ongoing and fluid nature of pandemic planning is very much evident in some of the complex and thorny issues that have no definitive answer. These may need to be revisited and rethought as scientific discoveries are made, as you approach a pandemic, and if your college's resources change. One such issue is the availability of expensive antivirals. The federal government has announced that it is stockpiling them and coming up with a strategy for distribution, which might seem to take some of the financial pressure off student health services. Barkin however has a caveat. "I'm concerned that stockpiles would not be distributed in enough of a timely fashion to make an impact on the community. Katrina is a situation that has to come to mind."

Even if you did manage to persuade campus decision-makers to invest budget in stockpiling antivirals, a potentially challenging feat, there's a chance that they would be ineffective by the time a pandemic occurs, as overuse can cause the emergence of a resistant strain. Barkin explains that infectious disease experts are talking about using a treatment cocktail - Tamiflu plus one or two other agents - to protect against the emergence of resistant strains, but this would be prohibitively expensive for the average college health center.

Another ethical dilemma surrounding pandemic planning concerns who should get prepandemic vaccines. Scientists are developing vaccines based on the strain of avian flu that has been circulating in Asia, hoping that the vaccine would be enough of a match to combat the illness until a proper vaccine could be developed six months after the pandemic's emergence. But supplies of this prepandemic vaccine will be limited.

"Some of the conversations around who should get these prepandemic vaccines are very complex," says Barkin. "Should it be health care workers that get it, or public safety workers such as firemen? Should it be government officials, or the very young and elderly?" Recently, the federal government has announced a three-tiered approach to vaccination that it has developed in consultation with public focus groups and ethicists that places health care workers in the second tier. Whether your health center staff will receive the vaccine, whether it will be in a timely fashion, and how effective it will actually be, are all factors that will affect your pandemic plan greatly - and demonstrate how much of your planning has to leave room for the unknown.

One thing that is beyond question is the importance of student health services acting now. Formulating a pandemic plan may be a slow and ponderous task, but there's one vital aspect that will slow the spread of a pandemic and can be tackled by your department immediately without getting tangled in red tape and endless meetings. Barkin elaborates:

"Every single student health service needs to be involved in educational outreach efforts to distribute information on the role of flu vaccinations, cough etiquette, when to come to work and when to stay at home if you are ill and the importance of creating a personal preparedness plan in the event of a pandemic."

This public health education can be a collaborative effort with human resources and residence life staff. Covely agrees and even suggests extending the scope beyond campus boundaries. "It's part of being a good and responsible neighbor to the community, and it has tremendous public relations benefits to the university," he says.

The collaboration required in pandemic planning can build bridges, but be prepared for it also to be particularly challenging. McGonigle relates:

"At Villanova, we're still in the stages of planning. We've done a lot. But I would say the most difficult part is trying to connect and communicate with all the different departments on campus and plan for all the different scenarios."

Indeed, planning for all contingencies - not just the obvious problems of effectively treating the sick and minimizing the mortality rate, but also coping with disruptions to services and shortages of supplies caused by huge absenteeism and the ensuing breakdown in the transportation system, and questions such as whether to pay staff if the campus is shut down - has caused planning at many colleges and universities to take much longer than anticipated.

Pandemic planning is also dogged by a sense of unreality: could something this vast really happen? (The answer, as every health professional knows, is "yes", and is a question of when and not if.) Media coverage of pandemic flu is patchy and focuses on sensational stories rather than the need for personal emergency preparedness. Because it's not an issue in the forefront of the public's mind, it's sometimes hard to conjure up the necessary sense of urgency, particularly because there is always some issue on campus demanding more immediate attention. Barkin sympathizes, but has some sobering last words on the subject.

"Recently, the issue of pandemic flu has fallen off the radar," she says. "We've been talking about it for two years and now there are other pressing issues that have pushed it to the back burner. But the issue of pandemics is not going to go away. We've had them throughout history and if you look at the patterns, we're due for a pandemic soon. It may or may not be H5N1, and it may or may not be on the 1918 scale. What we cannot ignore, however, is the planning that's needed, because in a pandemic, health centers and heath care providers will be looked to and expected to know how to respond."

Passing On The Tradition of Service in a Think Tank

Perhaps you have traced your ancestry and discovered that you have some public servants, military generals or famous politicians in your family tree. Maybe you have some industrial capitalists in there some where as well. If you do indeed have some strong family names with a lot of history behind them, shouldn't you do the family name some honor?

Not long ago, I met someone with a strong family name who indicated to me that he wished to join a think tank. We talked about this and I indicated that it is interesting that he studies Economics, Politics and History, as his ancestry has been making a lot of it for centuries now. He also had some famous generals in that lineage. The Defense of a nation is paramount if the civilization is to continue. All these subject matters are important at any serious Think Tank. This prompted me to ask:

So tell me, what brings to a think tank at this juncture of your life experience? Are you a student, professor now? What issues do you consider important at this time? It seems a bit of World History is being made during the present period and we are living through some turbulent times, although not as turbulent as past periods, yet interesting nevertheless? Surely, the decisions made today affect the forward progression of mankind into the next period.

Since he lived in Maine, we also got to talk about his state and area and I asked; Are there local issues in ME that concern you? Lobster shell problems, dead zones, price of natural gas, weather, economics, small business, downtown revitalization, securing clean industry and tech?

What issues do you find problematic for the Northeast over all? What are your thoughts on the former Governor of MA for President? Any thoughts on the Big Dig becoming a big disaster, if needed repairs go unchecked? How about alternative energies, robotics, nano-tech, defense tech, AI, VR, etc, as you live so close to so many top Universities, Technology Centers and Business Incubators, with lots of capital ready and waiting?

Of course, he was also interested in the bigger picture too and so we talked about more national and Global issues; What do you see is the biggest problem for our nation? Do you consider us a divided nation? Do you find this to be good, bad, indifferent, or opportunity for profits in the chaos? How about transportation, education, energy, borders, water supply, currency, trade deficits, consumer debt, health care, etc.?

What issues do you see on the World Scene? Do you feel that water, weather, oil, drugs, NGOs, genocide, child slave trade, urban slums, bird flu, are issues that need addressing? What are your thoughts on Radical Elements with radical motives? Where would you change things and what would you change at the city, state, region, national or Planet level?

Everything matters at a think tank, no detail is without merit, all must be considered to prevent the unintended consequences of linear thought. Perhaps you can see this, perhaps not, but if you do and feel strongly about it, maybe its in the genes and your family tradition, thus, shouldn't you give back a little as you grow? Think on it, talk with you soon.

Call Center Services Keep New Business Start-Ups From Failing

Before diving into a start up company there are many things to consider that could otherwise cause a financial disaster in a short period of time.

Statistically, about one and every three businesses will fail within the first two years. Often times it's just a matter of poor planning or lack of funding. The bottom line is that while the money may run out the bills wont and the employees will still expect their wages. The entrepreneur should take a close look at the cause of this alarming statistic before launching into to new venture. Naturally it is important to know your industry and your competitors but it's just as important to know how to save money on the every day costs.

One commonly overlooked investment is the use of call center services, and specifically telephone answering services. These services can literally help a company to save money and make money at the same time. Here's something to consider along the journey. When hiring a new full time receptionist a company can have payroll and taxes to the tune of about two thousand dollars a month. Additionally the employer will take on the cost of benefits, health insurance, and paid holidays. Further, if she's like most people she will call out sick, run late and when the phones aren't ringing she's still on the payroll.

An answering service is usually open twenty-four hours a day and every day of the year. They never close, call in sick, or complain. More importantly, with the exception of a small monthly fee, a good service will only charge for usage. When you are only charged for usage that means you are only charged when calls are being taken on your behalf. Phone answering services usually only run about one dollar per call which means you could literally have a service take one hundred calls a month and still only spend about a twenty five dollars a week. It's not even possible to hire a part time employee for that little amount of money.

The fact is most start ups can not afford the cost of a full time receptionist, but they know they really need one because they realize that an answering machine or taking your own calls says we're a tiny company and we may not be big enough to serve your needs. Bottom line, image is very important, and we naturally tend to think the small guy is unsuccessful or not able to handle our needs. While that may not be true, perception is everything. A service creates the image of having your own live secretary and dramatically improves the overall image of the business.

A final reason to consider using call center services is time. Most new business owners are extremely busy and are either with clients, up to their neck in paper work or need to focus on a big project. Being enslaved to a telephone is not an option and it just slows the entire work day down. Let's face it, you can't carry on twenty phone conversations a day and work at the same time. Further, if you're in a business that bills it service at an hourly rate it's just not right to spend time with other clients while your current customer pays for it. Let a service do it for you and you'll save time, money and create the image of being a big successful business owner.